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Full text of "Akbar, The Emperor Of India"

ON THE DIVINE INTUITION             185
r less from his own inner willing and speaking,
hen will the divine will speak into him. By which
aspeaking God's will embraces his will in Himself,
nd speaks into the image-like, natural, external
leason-life; and dissolves and illuminates the
arthly imagination of Reason's will, so that
nmediately the supersensible divine life and will
uds and incentres itself in Reason's will.
18.  For as little as the life's own will can, in
slfness and will turned  away from God,  stand
till in Nature a moment from its working, unless
: sink down beyond all Nature; so little also can
tie  divine speaking,  in the life resigned to the
round, stand still from its working.
19.  For if the life stand still from its own will,
; is in the abyss of Nature and creation, in the
ternal, divine utterance;   and hence God speaks
herein.
20.  For from God's speaking the life has pro-
eeded and come into body, and is nothing else
tian an image-like will of God.    Now if its own
nagination and will stand still, the divine imagin-
tion and will  arises.    For whatever is will-less
; with the Nothing but one thing, and is out of
r beyond all Nature, which jingroundedness is God
imself.
21.  Seeing then the  Unground  or  God is  an
ternal speaking, viz. a breathing forth of himself,
ae  Unground   accordingly  is  inspoken  into  the
^signed life ;   for the breathing of -the Unground
peaks through the stationary ground of the life,
'or the life has arisen from the divine breathing,
nd is a likeness of the divine breathing, therefore